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Success

Two of last night's classes. Sorry 4:30, I'll get you next time.

When people first start an endeavor, something like CrossFit, they often think that success is a straightforward path. Nothing can be further from the truth.  Awesome genetics, great programming, and remaining completely injury free will still not result in a perfectly straight upward path. Human beings have natural highs and lows in our biorhythms. And this results in highs and lows in our training.

Competitive athletes, CrossFit Games athletes included, have a specific season, a time frame to focus on and train for. Even within a training season, there will be times when differing stimuli produces differing results, and the key is to plan far in advance to peak perfectly at the correct time.

Most of life, however, does not have a specific season. There is not a specified time and place for success in life. Thus it is not always a perfectly upward path. CrossFit is exactly the same. Plateaus will need to broken, barriers busted through. There will be times where you just need to work hard without PRs in order to ascend to the next level. It is hard, but do not get frustrated, do not get discouraged or depressed. This is the natural order of life. Patience, practice, persistence, and not matter how hard it may get, never lose a sense of playfulness.

Please post thoughts and experiences to Comments.

Bike to the Gym Day is tomorrow! Wednesday, the 26th. Free coffee for all the morning classes.

Reminder: The gym will be closed this Saturday because of the Diamond in the Tough Competition. Enjoythe rest day and come support some of your friends that will be competing!! It’s going to be an awesome day!!

Workout:

OH Squat 5×3 @75% of last Friday’s 1RM

Then:

30 Pullups

10 Front Squats

30 Box Jumps

10 Squat Cleans

30 Burpees

10 Clean and Jerks

30 KB Swings

Barbell weight is 165/115#

1 Comment

  1. Thank you for sharing this Sam! I read an article HBR blog about how studies suggest that self-compassion, rather than self-esteem, leads to better performance in the long run. Check it out: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/09/to_succeed_forget_self-esteem.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+harvardbusiness+%28HBR.org%29